How-To: New Kitchen Flooring

Another in our modification series. This modification involves replacing the flooring in the kitchen of our trailer. The existing flooring was a very dark brown to black marble look that we’ve never really liked too much. The only good thing is that it hides dirt well. We decided to change it out and here are the steps we followed. Your unit will vary since we have a rear kitchen.

Here is a reference picture of what our kitchen looked like before we started. Note that the dark flooring does nothing to help the fact that our counter tops are black. It all makes for a fairly dark kitchen.

Starting point.

Starting point.

After some inspection, we realized that the railing along the front edge of the kitchen was holding down the linoleum on that side. We removed all the railing and the handrail next to the step. We also removed the rubber corner strip at the edge of the floor above the step.

Railing removed

Railing removed

The next step is to cut around the base of the cabinets and pull the linoleum up from the floor. It is not glued down, so it rolled off easily. It was stapled around some edges. We also had to remove the little bit of quarter molding along the left side of the kitchen at the floor.

Part way removed.

Part way removed.

Finally, because we couldn’t get very far under the front shelf on our slide (on the right), we just cut the flooring back as far as we could underneath that shelf. Once all the old flooring was removed, it looked like this.

All old flooring removed.

All old flooring removed.

The next step is to start laying the tiles one by one. We chose to start in the back corner near the sink and work our way forward. We didn’t use any prep on the floor base, nor was any suggested for the type of subfloor we had. We just swept ahead to keep the floor as dirt-free as possible.

First few tiles.

First few tiles.

Note that the rollers for our slide are fixed and the slide rolls in and out on top of them. When the slide is in, it more or less floats over the floor without touching it. Given that, we just pushed pieces of tile underneath the slide shelf and under the remaining linoleum so that the tiles could stick to the subfloor. No worries about a roller coming in and dislodging them.

More progress

More progress

We basically just worked our way around the dining bar and toward the front of the kitchen nearest the step, cutting everything fairly much flush with the front edge of the floor. The railing and the rubber strip will hold down the front edges.

Almost there.

Almost there.

Here is the floor all finished before trimming out and replacing parts.

Floor complete.

Floor complete.

With all the tiles in place, we put the railing back up and the black tread back on the edge of the floor.

Parts back in place.

Parts back in place.

The final step was to trim around the base of the cabinets and along the wall to the left with quarter round molding. We found pre-stained molding at Lowes in a color that was a very close match to our existing cabinetry.

Molding in place.

Molding in place.

The tiles are StyleSelections from Lowes. They are sold individually and in boxes of 20. We bought four boxes and used a little over two boxes (about 45 tiles). We plan on using the same tile in our bathroom.

The quarter round molding color is Oak Gunstock, again from Lowes.

Total cost breakdown for this project:

45 tiles at $0.88 each – $39.60

3 sticks of quarter round at $10.30 each – $30.90

Total, with tax: $76.32.

Note that we had a one-time charge of $101.69 for a air-driven brad nailer, brads, miter box and saw. All of these items can be reused for other projects.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.