How-To: Replace an Outdoor Kitchen Faucet

We replaced the faucet on our outdoor kitchen sink with a new one from the local home improvement store. The old faucet was working fine but was cheap plastic and very low. We wanted a swiveling faucet with a higher neck on it, similar to the one we put in our bathroom. The following How-To shows how to replace the outdoor faucet. Most of this applies to a bathroom faucet except for the fact that a bathroom faucet also typically has a pull-up handle for the sink drain and associated hardware for the drain stopper. This sink just has a simple drain with a stopper you drop down into it like a kitchen sink typically has.

Outdoor sink

Outdoor sink

The first step was to remove two screws that hold on the panel on the side of the riser where the sink is mounted. The panel just slips down and out from the frame revealing the plumbing underneath.

Trim panel removed

Trim panel removed

We turned off the water to the coach at the campground spigot, then turned on both faucet handles to relieve water pressure and let the water in the lines drain out.

The last of the water draining out

The last of the water draining out

To help catch any remaining water (and there was a fair amount still in the lines), we folded up several paper towels and put them underneath the faucet to catch any water.

Ready to catch water.

Ready to catch water.

It is a simple matter of unscrewing the hot and cold water lines from the bottom of the faucet. No tools were needed. Additionally, the faucet was held down with a big plastic threaded nut on each of the water inlets. The following pictures shows the threaded nuts on the faucet after it was removed.

Threaded nut.

Threaded nut.

The new faucet was dropped into place and the threaded nuts that hold it down were screwed on tight. The faucet was checked to make sure it wouldn’t move around. Then, the water lines were threaded on pretty tight. Remember, hot water (red pex line) on the left and cold water (blue pex line) on the right.

Water lines hooked back up

Water lines hooked back up

Might as well make sure the drain line is tight while you are in there. Also, our sink was a little loose in the counter. We found one of the brackets that holds it down tight had fallen off and another was very loose. They are just metal L brackets held on with wing nuts. The sink has threaded posts at each corner on the bottom and the L-bracket slides over the screw and the wing nut tightens it down so the sink doesn’t come out. No pictures of the mechanism, but feeling around with your hands will reveal the mounting method used in your situation.

New faucet in place

New faucet in place

With everything tightened down, it is time to test the connections. Turn the water on at the pedestal and watch carefully for any leaks under the sink. We found none, fortunately. Finally, a test at the faucet for proper operation.

Success.

Success.

With everything tested and working fine, it was time to put the trim panel back in place and secure it with the two screws we removed to take the panel off.

Securing the panel

Securing the panel

Note that this type of faucet is a fairly standard type known as a four inch centerset faucet. Most all bathroom sinks and the outdoor sink use the same size faucet. This means you can find a large selection available in the bathroom faucet area of your home improvement store.

 

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